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Facts About ALSA


 

 
On May 10, 2011, the Government of Alberta passed amendments that clarified the original intent of the legislation -- to plan for the future needs of Albertans and manage growth, while respecting existing property rights.
 
 
 
ALSA Fact and Fiction
 
Amendments to the Alberta Land Stewardship Act (ALSA) contain a clear statement that government must respect the property and other rights of individuals. ALSA does not limit any existing rights to compensation and respects all existing appeal provisions in Alberta legislation. It clarified that land titles and freehold mineral titles are not included in the definition of statutory consents.
 
 
 

Consultation

Under ALSA, consultation with Albertans is a legal requirement during the drafting of regional plans. Government must also present regional plans to the Legislature before Cabinet can approve them.

Respect for Existing Property Rights

Amendment to ALSA clarified the original intent of the legislation - to respect the property rights of individuals. ALSA is a clear statement that government must respect the property and other rights of individuals.

Compensation

ALSA does not limit any existing rights to compensation.

Access to Courts

ALSA respects all common law rights to appeal to the courts. ALSA also provides additional ways for Albertans to request compensation, a review or a variance in relation to a regional plan.

Conservation Directive

ALSA respects all existing rights or land owners. Under ALSA, the only new tool which enables a regional plan to declare permanent protection on private land for environmental or agricultural values is a conservation directive. A conservation directive allows Albertans to retain ownership of their land.