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Making and Amending Regional Plans


  

 

Making Regional Plans

 

Regional plans developed with Albertans and approved by Cabinet will integrate provincial policies at the regional level, set out regional land-use objectives and provide the context for land-use decision-making within the region, reflecting the uniqueness of the landscape and priorities of each region. 

 

 

Regional Planning Process

 

The development of a regional plan has multiple phases, each designated to ensure a focus on the region and provide opportunities for those who live and work in the region to provide information and feedback. Each phase builds on the one before under the administration of the Land Use Secretariat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Refer to Public Consultations to find out more about how you can contribute to regional planning.

 

 

Reviewing and Amending Regional Plans

 

Regional plans are legal documents and public policy for the region. They are enforceable. The Crown, government departments, local authorities, decision-makers, and the public must align plans and decisions with regional plans.  

 

Regional plans are subject to regular reviews and public reporting. At least once every five years, an audit committee will be appointed to determine if regional objectives and policies are meeting the purposes of the Alberta Land Stewardship Act. The committee will make a public report to the Stewardship Minister.

 

At least once every 10 years, a comprehensive review of the regional plan and a report on its effectiveness will be initiated by the Land Use Secretariat and submitted to the Stewardship Minister. This review may result in the plan being amended, replaced, renewed or repealed.

 

The world around us is constantly changing, and it's important for regional plans to be living documents that can be amended if necessary. Public consultation will be done prior to the approval of any amendments to a regional plan.

 

 

Amendments Published

 

The Lower Athabasca Regional Plan (2012) and the South Saskatchewan Regional Plan (2014) are now legally binding. The South Saskatchewan Regional Plan was amended in 2017.   Amendments to regional plans will be published in The Alberta Gazette and be available on this website.

 

 

 

Refer to Nature and Effect of Regional Plans to learn more about the legal nature of a regional plan, submitting a complaint, requesting for review, and applying for variance or compensation.